Medical Condition Definitions

Hope & Olive believes in providing as much information as we can about the medical and health conditions our recipients may be living with. These are common reasons why many individuals choose permanent makeup. Here you will find the definitions of the conditions mentioned on our website, as well as links to find more information about that specific condition.

Note: While there are a variety of reasons why someone may choose to have permanent makeup done, this list does not cover all of them – just the more common ones that we see.

Alopecia

Alopecia areata is a common autoimmune disease that results in the loss of hair on the scalp and elsewhere. It usually starts with one or more small, round, smooth patches. It occurs in males and females of all ages and races, but onset most often occurs in childhood. Approximately 6.8 million people in the United States and 147 million worldwide have or will develop alopecia areata at some point in their lives. In alopecia areata, the affected hair follicles are mistakenly attacked in groups by a person’s own immune system (white blood cells), resulting in the arrest of the hair growth stage. These affected follicles become very small, drastically slow down production, and grow no hair visible above the surface for months or years. The scalp is the most commonly affected area, but the beard or any hair-bearing site can be affected alone or together with the scalp. Some people develop only a few bare patches that regrow hair within a year. In others, extensive patchy loss occurs, and in a few, all scalp hair is lost (referred to as alopecia totalis) or, hair is lost from the entire scalp and body (referred to as alopecia universalis). No matter how widespread the hair loss, the hair follicles remain alive and are ready to resume normal hair production whenever they receive the appropriate signal. In all cases, hair regrowth may occur even without treatment and even after many years. (source)

Burns

A burn is tissue damage caused by heat, chemicals, electricity, sunlight, or nuclear radiation. The most common burns are those caused by hot liquid or steam, building fires, and flammable liquids and gases. Surgeons may treat large burns by removing burned tissue and covering the burn wound with a skin graft. This can affect the mobility of the skin and how hair may not grow in areas affected by the burns. (source)

Cleft Lip

A cleft lip can range from a little notch in the coloured part of the lip to a complete separation of the upper lip which can extend up and into the nose. This can affect one side of the mouth (unilateral) or both sides (bilateral), and can be complete (meaning the cleft goes up into the nose) or incomplete.

A cleft lip can also affect the gum where the teeth come through. Again, this can range from a small notch to a complete separation of the gum into two parts. (source)

Dermatillomania

Excoriation Disorder, also known as skin picking disorder or dermatillomania, is characterized by the repetitive picking of one’s own skin. Individuals who struggle with this disorder touch, rub, scratch, pick at, or dig into their skin in an attempt to improve perceived imperfections, often resulting in tissue damage, discoloration, or scarring. Skin picking disorder is one of a group of behaviors known as body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRBs), self-grooming behaviors in which individuals pull, pick, scrape, or bite their own hair, skin, or nails, resulting in damage to the body. (source)

Essential Tremor

Essential tremor is a nervous system (neurological) disorder that causes involuntary and rhythmic shaking. It can affect almost any part of your body, but the trembling occurs most often in your hands — especially when you do simple tasks, such as drinking from a glass or tying shoelaces.

Essential tremor is usually not a dangerous condition, but it typically worsens over time and can be severe in some people. Other conditions don’t cause essential tremor, although essential tremor is sometimes confused with Parkinson’s disease.

Essential tremor can occur at any age but is most common in people age 40 and older. (source)

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a complex disease in which damage to the optic nerve leads to progressive, irreversible vision loss. Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness. (source)

Gynecomastia

Gynecomastia (guy-nuh-koh-MAS-tee-uh) is an increase in the amount of breast gland tissue in boys or men, caused by an imbalance of the hormones estrogen and testosterone. Gynecomastia can affect one or both breasts, sometimes unevenly. (source)

Human Trafficking

Human trafficking involves the use of force, fraud, or coercion to obtain some type of labor or commercial sex act. Every year, millions of men, women, and children are trafficked worldwide – including right here in the United States. It can happen in any community and victims can be any age, race, gender, or nationality. Traffickers might use violence, manipulation, or false promises of well-paying jobs or romantic relationships to lure victims into trafficking situations. (source)

Much like how a farmer brands cattle, many times, human trafficking victims will be coerced into getting tattooed as a way to signify that they belong to a certain trafficker. Identifying tattoos related to human trafficking can make it easier for you to help intervene and provide assistance to these victims. Tattoos used by traffickers can vary by region. You can check with your local law enforcement agencies to inquire about the potential of tattoos identified as common in your community. (source)

Mastectomy

A mastectomy is surgery to remove all breast tissue from a breast as a way to treat or prevent breast cancer. (source)

Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects predominately dopamine-producing (“dopaminergic”) neurons in a specific area of the brain called substantia nigra. People with PD may experience: Tremor, mainly at rest and described as pill rolling tremor in hands. (source)

Trichotillomania

Trichotillomania (trick-o-till-o-may-nee-uh) (TTM or “trich”), also known as hair pulling disorder, is characterized by the repetitive pulling out of one’s hair. Trichotillomania is one of a group of behaviors known as body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRBs), self-grooming behaviors in which individuals pull, pick, scrape, or bite their hair, skin, or nails, resulting in damage to the body.

Research indicates that about 1 or 2 in 50 people experience trichotillomania in their lifetime. It usually begins in late childhood/early puberty. In childhood, it occurs about equally in boys and girls. By adulthood, 80-90% of reported cases are women. Hair pulling varies greatly in its severity, location on the body, and response to treatment. Without treatment, trichotillomania tends to be a chronic condition; that may come and go throughout a lifetime. (source